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succession

September 1, 2006

At 72 years of age, Nils Larson thought it was too soon to begin the transition of his family’s publishing house to the fourth generation.

At 72 years of age, Nils Larson thought it was too soon to begin the transition of his family's publishing house to the fourth generation. He believed no-one in the business was qualified to take over his duties as publisher and CEO. Despite the urgings of family members on the company's board, Mr Larson took solace in the fact that his good friend and general practice attorney, Fred Wertheimer, was not pressing him to act.

July 1, 2006

This year on 20-22 September in Cannes, the Family Business Network will create a private and confidential environment for family businesses to discuss key issues and live cases on the topic of ‘building success on talent’. Olivier de Richoufftz explains the FBN approach

Olivier de Richoufftz is executive director, FBN International, Switzerland.

This year on 20-22 September in Cannes, the Family Business Network will create a private and confidential environment for family businesses to discuss key issues and live cases on the topic of 'building success on talent'. Olivier de Richoufftz explains the FBN approach

July 1, 2006

Jim, aged 66, is the founding entrepreneur of a successful manufacturing company, with annual sales of $200 million, and has gradually transferred ownership of the business to the second generation. All five siblings, each employed in the company, will eventually own 20% of the business. Apart from their comfortable home, local farmland and $500,000 invested conservatively, all the assets of Jim and his wife Beth have been re-invested in JB Enterprises.

May 1, 2006

Restrictions on succession issues potentially limit the profitable continuity of Italian family businesses. However, recent legislative changes have paved the way to substantially improve the situation, as Gioacchina Attanzio reveals

Gioacchino Attanzio  is managing director of AIdAF (FBN Italy).

Restrictions on succession issues potentially limit the profitable continuity of Italian family businesses. However, recent legislative changes have paved the way to substantially improve the situation, as Gioacchina Attanzio reveals

January 1, 2006

Karen Vinton is a family business consultant with Vinton Consulting.

If an heir is to be accepted by the workforce as a valid and hard-working employee, they have to prove they can contribute. At the same time they have to lose the old image of themselves as a free-loading teenager. Karen Vinton sets out the steps to success

January 1, 2006

Parental expectations and tradition can be a heavy mantle for heirs to inherit. Charles Sasse examines the issues that affect business families from the cradle to succession, and offers insights, practical as well as psychological, into how to lighten the load

Charles Sasse is president of the Belgian Association for Psychotherapy. He now practices as a psychoanalyst and consultant.

Parental expectations and tradition can be a heavy mantle for heirs to inherit. Charles Sasse examines the issues that affect business families from the cradle to succession, and offers insights, practical as well as psychological, into how to lighten the load

November 1, 2005

One-third of Australian family business leaders do not know who is going to take over the business when they retire. And a study also has revealed that more than a quarter of them do not have an exit strategy in place.

One-third of Australian family business leaders do not know who is going to take over the business when they retire. And a study also has revealed that more than a quarter of them do not have an exit strategy in place.

November 1, 2005

Family leaders can hamper progress and deter successors from taking over the running of the company. Dennis Jaffe summarises why it is important to keep a good work-life balance and the need for leaders to be aware of when the time is right to transfer power

Dennis Jaffe is a founding member of the Aspen Family Business Group. www.aspenfamilybusiness.com

Family leaders can hamper progress and deter successors from taking over the running of the company. Dennis Jaffe summarises why it is important to keep a good work-life balance and the need for leaders to be aware of when the time is right to transfer power

November 1, 2005

Barbara Murray is director of Family Business Solutions UK.

Passing on the baton of responsibility is not easily achieved, particularly as demographic changes are intensifying the time pressures felt by senior and junior generations to plan their successions. Barbara Murray explains the importance of legacy and preparation

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