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succession

November 1, 2005

Family leaders can hamper progress and deter successors from taking over the running of the company. Dennis Jaffe summarises why it is important to keep a good work-life balance and the need for leaders to be aware of when the time is right to transfer power

Dennis Jaffe is a founding member of the Aspen Family Business Group. www.aspenfamilybusiness.com

Family leaders can hamper progress and deter successors from taking over the running of the company. Dennis Jaffe summarises why it is important to keep a good work-life balance and the need for leaders to be aware of when the time is right to transfer power

November 1, 2005

Barbara Murray is director of Family Business Solutions UK.

Passing on the baton of responsibility is not easily achieved, particularly as demographic changes are intensifying the time pressures felt by senior and junior generations to plan their successions. Barbara Murray explains the importance of legacy and preparation

November 1, 2005

Jorgen Vig Knudstorp talks to Melanie Stern about his first year as CEO of the Danish family business and toy giant Lego, how he led the company out of a period of financial risk and his mandate to fix the national treasure

Melanie stern is section editor of Families in Business.

Jorgen Vig Knudstorp talks to Melanie Stern about his first year as CEO of the Danish family business and toy giant Lego, how he led the company out of a period of financial risk and his mandate to fix the national treasure

November 1, 2005

“The creation of something new is not accomplished by intellect, but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves” (Carl Jung)

John Tucker is a Grant Thornton Fellow in Family Business at the International Centre for Families in Business.

"The creation of something new is not accomplished by intellect, but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity. The creative mind plays with the objects it loves" (Carl Jung)

September 1, 2005

There are several reasons why some family businesses may seek outsiders to run the show, including lack of a successor or inability of a director to manage a growing firm. Vincent Costantini outlines the circumstances and benefits of professional input

Vincent Costantini is managing partner at Roseview Group. www.roseview

There are several reasons why some family businesses may seek outsiders to run the show, including lack of a successor or inability of a director to manage a growing firm. Vincent Costantini outlines the circumstances and benefits of professional input

September 1, 2005

Since deregulation of the market, private business has mushroomed in Russia. But now family firms face issues such as succession and governance. The editor of the Russian version of Families in Business, Shamil Magomedov, outlines the situation

Since deregulation of the market, private business has mushroomed in Russia. But now family firms face issues such as succession and governance. The editor of the Russian version of Families in Business, Shamil Magomedov, outlines the situation

As a managing editor of the Russian edition of Families in Business, I  ask myself: What would I say about my own country? A country of great history and culture. It is a melting pot of change with amazing opportunities.
 

May 1, 2005

Family members should be encouraged to gradually take on responsibility in running the business as soon as they are able to work – so when the time is ripe for succession, the company will flourish rather than wither on the vine, writes James Hutcheson

James Olan Hutcheson is founder and president of Regeneration Partners. jim@regeneration-partners.com

Family members should be encouraged to gradually take on responsibility in running the business as soon as they are able to work – so when the time is ripe for succession, the company will flourish rather than wither on the vine, writes James Hutcheson

May 1, 2005

Employing family members can be fraught with problems, but, argue John Ward and Steve Waichler, if it’s done with care and there is a good training and reward system in place, loyalty and commitment can strengthen your company and give it an edge

Steve Waichler is a director of Follett and president of the Waichler Family Council. John Ward is Wild Group professor of Family Business at IMD in Switzerland. www.johnlward.com

Employing family members can be fraught with problems, but, argue John Ward and Steve Waichler, if it's done with care and there is a good training and reward system in place, loyalty and commitment can strengthen your company and give it an edge

May 1, 2005

To prepare your heirs to take the reins of your family business, you must start early and be more of a mentor than a boss. Karen Vinton believes that a light touch and plenty of encouragement are the best way to reap satisfying dividends from willing offspring

Karen Vinton is a family business consultant with Vinton Consulting Services in Gallatin Gateway, Montana

To prepare your heirs to take the reins of your family business, you must start early and be more of a mentor than a boss. Karen Vinton believes that a light touch and plenty of encouragement are the best way to reap satisfying dividends from willing offspring

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