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April 30, 2013

The value of prime real estate in New York, London, Hong Kong and Singapore is set to rise by 27% in the next five years, due to the growing number of ultra-high net worth individuals globally, according to recent research.

The value of prime real estate in New York, London, Hong Kong and Singapore is set to rise by 27% in the next five years, due to the growing number of ultra-high net worth individuals globally, according to recent research.

The Global Prime Sector Report – published by property developers Candy & Candy, Deutsche Bank and estate agent Savills – found that by 2017 the UHNW population was expected to increased by 20%, with their collective wealth increasing by 30% as international markets recover.

October 13, 2011

LVMH’s Arnault family has taken majority control of Heng Long, the crocodile leather supplier owned by the Koh family, in what is the luxury goods company’s second purchase this year of a top-end family business.

LVMH’s Arnault family has taken majority control of Heng Long, the crocodile leather supplier owned by the Koh family, in what is the luxury goods company’s second purchase this year of a top-end family business.

Paris-based LVMH, chaired by Bernard Arnault, said in a statement that it will own 51% of Heng Long, while the founding Koh family will reduce its stake to 49% from its earlier 74% ownership of the Singapore-based company.

July 25, 2011

Private client law firm Withers plans to open an office in Singapore as it targets the city-state’s big wealth management sector.

Private client law firm Withers plans to open an office in Singapore as it targets the city-state’s big wealth management sector.

A spokeswoman for Withers told Campden that the launch was subject to approval from the partners, but was unable to give specific dates. She said: “Singapore is an important part of the global wealth horizon and we are seeing a lot of activity in the region.”

February 15, 2011

Family-controlled agricultural trader Louis Dreyfus’ plans for a possible merger with rival Olam International has come to an end, raising speculations about the future of the company.

Family-controlled agricultural trader Louis Dreyfus' plans for a possible merger with rival Olam International has come to an end, raising speculations about the future of the company.

Merger plans between Paris-based Louis Dreyfus and Singapore-based Olam, first announced in September 2010, have been reported to have collapsed due to over differing views on how to grow the business. Analysts say that a merger between the two would have created the world's third-largest agricultural trading house, with an estimated market value of between $15 and $18 billion.

June 18, 2010

With the transfer of wealth to the next generation of Asians underway and growing interest from highly-taxed western families, the region’s financial centres are rushing to court family offices, writes Paul Golden.

With the transfer of wealth to the next generation of Asians underway and growing interest from highly-taxed western families, the region's financial centres are rushing to court family offices, writes Paul Golden.

The relatively high percentage of first generation wealth creators in Asia has heightened awareness of family office services across the continent, with the major financial centres keen to promote themselves as the location of choice for these aspiring dynasties.

March 1, 2008

Family businesses in Asia are finding it hard to keep up with developments around the globe and shipping giant IMC Group is no exception. However, family member Yuelin Yang explains to Bruce Love that, with the help of outside professionals, the tide is starting to turn

Family businesses in Asia are finding it hard to keep up with developments around the globe and shipping giant IMC Group is no exception. However, family member Yuelin Yang explains to Bruce Love that, with the help of outside professionals, the tide is starting to turn

January 1, 2007

A series of unfortunate events delayed Banyan Tree’s IPO for six years. But they forced a risk management plan that will take one of Asia’s top luxury spa brands onto the global stage

Melanie Stern is the former section editor of Families in Business.

A series of unfortunate events delayed Banyan Tree's IPO for six years. But they forced a risk management plan that will take one of Asia's top luxury spa brands onto the global stage

January 1, 2007

As an international financial centre, Singapore offers financial institutions a conducive, pro-business environment, cost-competitiveness and a highly-skilled and cosmopolitan labour force. Furthermore, it has long been recognised as one of the best cities for business with a strategic geographical location, at the heart of the rapidly-developing Asian market. So, it seems that doing business in, or with, Singapore is a no-brainer – yet we here very little about the country in comparison with other Asian powerhouses. Families in Business spoke with Erina Han of the Monetary Authority of Singapore to find out what’s on offer in Singapore for family businesses

As an international financial centre, Singapore offers financial institutions a conducive, pro-business environment, cost-competitiveness and a highly-skilled and cosmopolitan labour force. Furthermore, it has long been recognised as one of the best cities for business with a strategic geographical location, at the heart of the rapidly-developing Asian market. So, it seems that doing business in, or with, Singapore is a no-brainer – yet we here very little about the country in comparison with other Asian powerhouses.

September 1, 2006

Singapore’s competitiveness as a nation will depend on the success of local Chinese family enterprises. Wee-Liang Tan discusses how their traditional outlook may well prove to be a hindrance to both their own long-term growth and the growth of the economy

Wee-Liang Tan is associate professor of entrepreneurship and law at the Lee Kong Chian School of Business, Singapore Management University.

Singapore's competitiveness as a nation will depend on the success of local Chinese family enterprises. Wee-Liang Tan discusses how their traditional outlook may well prove to be a hindrance to both their own long-term growth and the growth of the economy

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