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English

June 9, 2020

Before the Covid-19 pandemic, the main challenge posed to the dominance of the English legal system appeared to be Brexit. A flurry of English language courts opened in European cities, touting for business that would otherwise come to the English High Court. We know that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, so is it any surprise that litigants—including ultra-wealthy clients—still choose the English Courts to resolve their disputes?

Before the Covid-19 pandemic, the main challenge posed to the dominance of the English legal system appeared to be Brexit. A flurry of English language courts opened in European cities, touting for business that would otherwise come to the English High Court. We know that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, so is it any surprise that litigants—including ultra-wealthy clients—still choose the English Courts to resolve their disputes?

The appeal of English Courts

December 3, 2019

The year 2020 will mark the 10th anniversary of the landmark UK Supreme Court case of Radmacher v Granatino. This means that 10 years have passed during which wealthy individuals have had the opportunity to contract out of the notoriously generous divorce jurisdiction of the English and Welsh courts. Whilst nuptial agreements existed prior to Radmacher, there was no certainty they would be upheld if they were challenged in court.

The year 2020 will mark the 10th anniversary of the landmark UK Supreme Court case of Radmacher v Granatino. This means that 10 years have passed during which wealthy individuals have had the opportunity to contract out of the notoriously generous divorce jurisdiction of the English and Welsh courts. Whilst nuptial agreements existed prior to Radmacher, there was no certainty they would be upheld if they were challenged in court.

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