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April 10, 2020

A decade-old, blockchain technology is facing an inflection point. A few years ago it was easy to find people who were evangelically enthusiastic about it. A 2015 World Economic Forum survey of more than 800 executives and experts from the information and communications technology sector found the majority believed that by 2027, 10% of global GDP would be stored on blockchain technology.

Facebook’s Libra launch shows blockchain has entered the mainstream. Jeremy Hazlehurst looks at what the technology really means for family businesses

A decade-old, blockchain technology is facing an inflection point. A few years ago it was easy to find people who were evangelically enthusiastic about it. A 2015 World Economic Forum survey of more than 800 executives and experts from the information and communications technology sector found the majority believed that by 2027, 10% of global GDP would be stored on blockchain technology.

February 21, 2020

An inconvenient side effect to living in today’s fully digitised world is that threats have also gone digital—become more difficult to discover, track and neutralise. All financial institutions are now faced with the colossal task of protecting against increased threats to their business, no matter how ‘under the radar’ their profiles have traditionally been—family offices included.

An inconvenient side effect to living in today’s fully digitised world is that threats have also gone digital—become more difficult to discover, track and neutralise. All financial institutions are now faced with the colossal task of protecting against increased threats to their business, no matter how ‘under the radar’ their profiles have traditionally been—family offices included.

October 8, 2018

With cybersecurity breaches at well-known companies hitting the headlines, it is easy to believe that family offices which maintain a low profile would not be a prime target for digital fraud.

With cybersecurity breaches at well-known companies hitting the headlines, it is easy to believe that family offices which maintain a low profile would not be a prime target for digital fraud.

However, this ignores the attractiveness of the information that is stored by a family office, their advisers and their financial institutions—information and data which is potentially useful to criminals who wish to steal from, harm or damage the reputation of a wealthy family.

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