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Passion Investments

October 31, 2014

Racing? So passé. Eventing? So last season. Dressage is the equestrian sport getting the wealthy chomping at the bit, and more newcomers than ever are ready to spend big to get involved.

Those who followed Republican Mitt Romney’s run for the 2012 US presidential elections will remember the multi-millionaire’s bumbling attempts to connect with the working classes. So imagine the Democrats’ glee when it emerged his wife was the co-owner of a million-dollar dressage horse, Rafalca, which was preparing to compete at the London Olympic Games. The couple, it emerged during the campaign trail, spent $77,000 (€61,300) annually on the German-bred mare – $50,000 more than the average US salary.

August 15, 2014

Most people wouldn’t fancy tapping into a beverage bottled in the time of Napoleon, but the longevity of liquors means some of the rarer tipples can pull extraordinary prices among well-heeled consumers.

When self-made Dutch millionaire Bay van der Bunt put his extensive cellar up for sale a couple of years ago, he shone a light on both the collectibility and the investability of rare liquors. His 5,000-bottle collection, said to be the world’s largest, included a cognac that had travelled with Napoleon’s army, and another from the Duke of Windsor’s Paris cellar. In all, it was valued at €6 million.

July 3, 2014

Beluga caviar, cigars and fine dining are among the luxury goods and services that became more affordable for wealthy Londoners over the last year, according to new research, marking a significant fall in price inflation. 

Beluga caviar, cigars and fine dining are among the luxury goods and services that became more affordable for wealthy Londoners over the last year, according to new research, marking a significant fall in price inflation.

Conducted by multi family office Stonehage, the research found the decrease was primarily fuelled by a 9.7% fall in the price of luxury consumables.

April 3, 2014

Forget attending packed auctions and phone bids, buying a top-end collectible is now just a click away. 

In December of 2012 Edward Hopper’s painting October on Cape Cod (pictured, below right) was sold at auction by Christie’s for $9.6 million (€7.1 million). Nothing unusual about that, you might say. But the buyer wasn’t in the room, and not even on the end of a phone, but watching the auction live through an online stream. That is, so far, the most that anybody has paid for a painting while bidding over the internet.

January 22, 2014

An original Apple Mac prototype was the most expensive purchase made through Christie’s online-only auctions in 2013, as the auction house invests in its Internet platform to drive sales.

An original Apple Mac prototype was the most expensive purchase made through Christie’s online-only auctions in 2013, as the auction house invests in its Internet platform to drive sales.

Christie’s, which is part of Francois-Henri Pinault’s holding company, Groupe Artemis, posted sales of £4.54 billion (€5.5 billion) for the year ended December 2013, up 16% on the previous year – the highest sales total for any auction house in the history of the art market.

January 8, 2014

Classic cars have topped a new passion investment index released this week, while when it comes to fine art, traditional Chinese works have provided the most lucrative returns.

Classic cars have topped a new passion investment index released this week, while when it comes to fine art, traditional Chinese works have provided the most lucrative returns.

According to The Coutts Index: Objects of Desire classic cars saw a 257% return on investment over a seven-and-a-half year period, starting in 2005, well ahead of the next most profitable passion investment, classic watches, which saw returns of 176%.

January 1, 2014

With email pushing the utilitarian value of stamps towards redundancy, what will become of the world’s philatelic collections and how do they stand as an investment?Campden reports.
 

As a child growing up in 1960s America, Donald Sundman’s father gave him a stamp album and some inexpensive stamps. “I lived in a small town in New Hampshire and so stamps were really a window into a larger world, where you could see stamps from countries that didn’t exist anymore, because World War I and World War II changed the map so much, and there were different languages. It was very exotic.”

October 17, 2013

This summer big brand artists continued to set records at the major auction houses. But like all passion investments, art occupies a grey area between investment and lifestyle asset, so what role can it play in a family office’s portfolio? 

This summer big brand artists continued to set records at the major auction houses. But like all passion investments, art occupies a grey area between investment and lifestyle asset, so what role can it play in a family office’s portfolio? 

August 20, 2013

In a rare interview, CampdenFB talks to Mishal Kanoo, deputy chairman of one of the Middle East’s top family businesses, the Kanoo Group.

Family life is extremely private in the Gulf. In a way, it is not surprising that people who dress so conservatively, with women shrouded in black and men cloaked in white, should be so guarded in showing a public face. In the same way, family businesses in the Gulf Cooperation Council, which make up the vast majority of the successful corporations there, are curiously reluctant to share their successes with the press. For this reason, the willingness of Mishal Kanoo, deputy chairman of the GCC-based Kanoo Group, to speak to CampdenFB, is all the more remarkable.

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