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January 1, 2005

Johan Lambrecht and Diane Arijs are respectively director and scientific researcher of the Research Centre for Entrepreneurship, EHSAL-KU Brussel in Brussels.

"Any fool can make a fortune. It takes a man of brains to hold on to it after it is made."

January 1, 2005

It takes a lot more than entrepreneurial spirit to sustain a family and its long-term business success – vision, values and planning also play a role. The key, as Amy Braden discovers, is integrating them

Amy Braden is a managing director of JPMorgan Private Bank and head of its Family Wealth Centre in New York. www.jpmorgan.com/privatebank

Wealthy families with problems – business disputes, wayward children, expensive divorces – make for tasty media fare. What you won't often find in the news, however, are the families who have mastered the delicate art of successfully stewarding collective wealth for the benefit of family and society alike.

September 1, 2004

The globalisation of world economies means many family businesses must grow strategically to survive. More often than not, the growth capital requirements of the family firm clash with the liquidity and control needs of the family shareholders. What to do? Francois de Visscher explains

Francois de Visscher is founder and president of the family business consultancy de Visscher & Co.

The globalisation of world economies means many family businesses must grow strategically to survive. More often than not, the growth capital requirements of the family firm clash with the liquidity and control needs of the family shareholders. What to do? Francois de Visscher explains

September 1, 2004

Choosing between legacy and liquidity

Peter Munro, CEO of Turner-Munro International, a large family-owned furniture manufacturer, finds himself at a crossroads shortly after the death of his long-time business partner. Should he sell the business or keep it in the family?

Peter, age 69, never imagined that he might consider selling the business that he and his partner Lawrence Turner founded nearly 40 years ago. Childhood friends, Peter and Lawrence became business partners in their late 20s. Together, they built a sizeable, profitable company, one of the largest furniture manufacturers in the region.

July 1, 2004

Finland may be a small country overshadowed by its dominant neighbour Russia, but has a tenacious family business sector powering a stable economy. Krista Elo-Pärsinnen reports

Finland may be a small country overshadowed by its dominant neighbour Russia, but has a tenacious family business sector powering a stable economy.

Finland's family businesses embody 'accountable ownership' with a face – they are arguably the backbone of the economy as well as the engine powering it. Their broad goal is not unlike family business owners the world over: to pass down an enterprise in a better condition than when they themselves took over.

July 1, 2004

You don’t have to throw your company to the lions when the time for exit approaches. Melanie Stern examines how selling to your managers or staff can provide another way out

Melanie Stern is Section Editor of Families in Business magazine.

You don't have to throw your company to the lions when the time for exit approaches. Melanie Stern examines how selling to your managers or staff can provide another way out

Yeah, yeah, yeah – so we know that business-owning families have never sat pretty with the idea of exiting by selling their beloved companies to a rival, and even less so with going to market.
 

July 1, 2004

Public markets are not only an attractive alternative source of finance for family or owner-managed businesses but provide a cost-effective exit strategy for the founders without losing control of the business, explains Jonathan Jenkins

Jonathan Jenkins is joint managing director of OFEX.

Public markets are not only an attractive alternative source of finance for family or owner-managed businesses but provide a cost-effective exit strategy for the founders without losing control of the business, explains Jonathan Jenkins

July 1, 2004

Most of us are familiar with the statistics illustrating family businesses’ mistrust of venture capital. Just 0.9% of UK business families turn to this sector for development finance, according to Manchester Business School, as opposed to the 72% who stick to bank loans.

Most of us are familiar with the statistics illustrating family businesses' mistrust of venture capital. Just 0.9% of UK business families turn to this sector for development finance, according to Manchester Business School, as opposed to the 72% who stick to bank loans.

May 1, 2004

The prospect of an infusion of cash can be tantalising for family firms considering a share float. But are families willing to shoulder the regulatory scrutiny that follows an IPO? Adam Knight reports

Adam Knight is a freelance financial journalist specialising in family business.

The prospect of an infusion of cash can be tantalising for family firms considering a share float. But are families willing to shoulder the regulatory scrutiny that follows an IPO? Adam Knight reports

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