Vimeo
LinkedIn
Instagram
Share |

Comment

October 30, 2012

Stories about corruption follow a familiar arc. It is exposed by the press (or bloggers) and condemned, and then others come along who shrug in a worldly way, give a wry smile and explain that this is how business is done.

Not many people have heard of Yang Dacai until August, when he was photographed smirking at the side of the road where 36 people had died in a car crash. That smile made the head of Shaanxi province’s Bureau of Work Safety a hate-figure among Chinese bloggers, who soon started digging into his life.

October 16, 2012

One thing the financial meltdown of 2008 and the subsequent slowdown in economic growth for much of the world has sparked is a debate about the appropriate types of capitalism for the future. Much talk has centred on reining in the excesses of the financial services sector that nearly led the world into global depression.

One thing the financial meltdown of 2008 and the subsequent slowdown in economic growth for much of the world has sparked is a debate about the appropriate types of capitalism for the future. Much talk has centred on reining in the excesses of the financial services sector that nearly led the world into global depression.

October 9, 2012

Five years after the credit crisis began we have entered a bull market for regulation. It is stretching further, and faster, than most of us realise. The process is inevitable, following recent excesses. Some aspects of it are beneficial. But the line between market regulation and capital punishment is becoming increasingly thin.

Five years after the credit crisis began we have entered a bull market for regulation. It is stretching further, and faster, than most of us realise. The process is inevitable, following recent excesses. Some aspects of it are beneficial. But the line between market regulation and capital punishment is becoming increasingly thin. 

September 24, 2012

Who is the world’s best-read writer? Arguably, it’s a bloke called Han Han, a 30-year-old novelist, blogger, musician, racing driver and provocateur from China who looks like he could be in a Korean boy band. His cheeky, satirical books sell in their millions to the “post-1980s generation”, and his blog posts are big news.

Who is the world’s best-read writer? Arguably, it’s a bloke called Han Han, a 30-year-old novelist, blogger, musician, racing driver and provocateur from China who looks like he could be in a Korean boy band. His cheeky, satirical books sell in their millions to the “post-1980s generation”, and his blog posts are big news.
 

September 20, 2012

To be sure, yields on high yield bonds – or junk, as it was once called – look less enticing than the 15% on offer three years ago. But those yields reflected fears that the global banking system was close to collapse. These have now receded, making high yield safer.

Five years after the run on the UK bank Northern Rock, companies lacking blue chip status are struggling to extract loans from banks more interested in their own survival than backing expansion.

As a result, companies are turning to the capital markets to secure loans from wealthy investors and institutions. They are paying interest charges of between 5.5% and 7% - a fat premium to the nearly zero return on savings accounts and government bonds.

September 11, 2012

Very few people wish to take a risk at the moment. With both consumers and businesses hunkered down in the trenches and the shells of uncertainty flying overhead, merely hanging onto and guarding what you’ve got rather than going forth to multiply is the order of the day.  

Very few people wish to take a risk at the moment. With both consumers and businesses hunkered down in the trenches and the shells of uncertainty flying overhead, merely hanging onto and guarding what you’ve got rather than going forth to multiply is the order of the day.   
 

September 6, 2012

Families will feud. They will feud between themselves and with other families. These feuds can get pretty nasty, and when there’s money and power involved the nastiness often gets aired in public.

Families will feud. They will feud between themselves and with other families. These feuds can get pretty nasty, and when there’s money and power involved the nastiness often gets aired in public.

So it is with two of France’s most powerful families – the 70-plus family members behind Hermes and the Arnaults, or more specifically, the patriarch, Bernard Arnault. Arnault and his family control more than 40% of the world’s biggest luxury products business, LVMH.

August 30, 2012

The world has changed and some businesses that worked in the past won’t work in the future. Elisabeth Murdoch can’t be the only next-gen wondering if it’s easier just to jump ship and build something better.

When Elisabeth Murdoch stood up to deliver the MacTaggart Lecture recently – the main event at an annual British media jamboree in Edinburgh – the audience may have braced itself for a repeat of her brother James’s infamous appearance before British parliament.

Explaining why journalists at the newspapers he ran were hacking the phones of murdered girls and bombing victims, he lapsed into incomprehensible management jargon, blathering about “pushbacks” and “financial quantum”. Fortunately Elisabeth is made from different stuff.

August 28, 2012

It’s getting hard to avoid noticing the impact of climate change, but mankind (true to form) is trying its best to do so.

It’s getting hard to avoid noticing the impact of climate change, but mankind (true to form) is trying its best to do so.

The threat, which mainly results through emissions of carbon dioxide from the burning of fossil fuels, is absent from the US presidential debate. Republicans call it a hoax. The Democrats have other priorities.

The UK coalition government is close to reversing a pledge to oppose a third runway at Heathrow Airport, once a plank for its green credentials.

Why the lack of interest?

Click here >>
Close