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sotheby

July 19, 2011

Last November, Sotheby’s New York was set to auction Blanchisseuses souffrant des dents by the Impressionist master Edgar Degas, carrying an estimated value of $350,000 to $450,000 (€248,000-€318,900). But at the eleventh hour, the small, six-by-eight inch portrait of a laundrywoman with an aching tooth was mysteriously withdrawn from sale.

Last November, Sotheby’s New York was set to auction Blanchisseuses souffrant des dents by the Impressionist master Edgar Degas, carrying an estimated value of $350,000 to $450,000 (€248,000-€318,900). But at the eleventh hour, the small, six-by-eight inch portrait of a laundrywoman with an aching tooth was mysteriously withdrawn from sale.

May 25, 2011

Antique fakes are almost as old as the antiques themselves. Christopher Owen, who helped expose one of the greatest frauds in the history of the market, tells the tale – and the lessons that buyers should draw from it.

Michael Smith, one of America’s top interior designers who was commissioned by the Obamas to redo the interiors of the White House, was taken aback when a friend called from London in early 2008 with some disturbing news.

According to a prominent London newspaper, John Hobbs, one of London’s premier antiques dealers, specialising in the most expensive English and Continental furniture, had been publicly accused by his restorer of selling fakes.

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