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planning

August 30, 2017

When it comes to succession, some business families plan well and some don’t, whether the next generation is ready or not. Scott McCulloch reports.

When it comes to succession, some business families plan well and some don’t, whether the next generation is ready or not. Scott McCulloch reports.

Here is a scenario: What if a patriarch–a maverick whose family firm, built over four decades and turning over more than €100 million ($105 million) annually–dies in office without leaving his children a set of instructions on how to run the show?

December 9, 2009

It's impossible to pick up a paper anywhere in the world without encountering news of the debt drama in Dubai, where family businesses dominate the economic landscape, writes Amy Schuman

Amy Schuman is a principal of the Family Business Consulting Group and a founding facilitator of the Next Generation Leadership Institute, part of the Loyola University Chicago Family Business Centre. 

March 1, 2004

Transitioning the family business from one generation to the next is fraught with hardship, headaches and high drama. So says the mainstream press but it’s just not so

Andrew Keyt is Executive Director of the Family Business Center at Loyola University Chicago and President of the US Chapter of the FBN.

Transitioning the family business from one generation to the next is fraught with hardship, headaches and high drama. So says the mainstream press but it's just not so

June 1, 2003

A family business that is mindful of the need for proper planning, monitoring and maintenance of legal issues will ultimately be more profitable and successful over the long-term

Patricia Angus is a lawyer and consultant to high net worth families on governance and philanthropic planning. She is President of Angus Advisory Group LLC in New York, USA.

A family business that is mindful of the need for proper planning, monitoring and maintenance of legal issues will ultimately be more profitable and successful over the long-term

April 1, 2003

It is never too late to start planning for succession. The financial/business options for providing what meets each family member’s needs are not as limited as they may at first appear

Justine Ferguson is a consultant with Family Business Solutions Limited and an associate with Wright, Johnston & Mackenzie Solicitors based in Glasgow, Scotland.

It is never too late to start planning for succession. The financial/business options for providing what meets each family member's needs are not as limited as they may at first appear

April 1, 2003

The family council can provide a forum where families can discuss strategic issues and formulate policies that are well-matched to their goals as shareholders

Grant Gordon is Director General of the Institute for Family Business (UK).

The family council can provide a forum where families can discuss strategic issues and formulate policies that are well-matched to their goals as shareholders

In family business, planning for the future is one of the keys to securing long-term shareholder adhesion to the family project. The family council is arguably one of the principal tools at the disposal of families to help better plan their futures and exercise greater control over the outcomes.

April 1, 2003

Family owners, and all major shareholders in the family business, need to understand the strategic planning process of their business to sustain the long-term value of their company

John L Ward is the Co-Director of the Center for Family Enterprises at Kellogg Graduate School of Management (USA) and the Wild Group Professor of Family Business at IMD (Switzerland). He serves on the boards of four family companies in Europe and the USA.

Randel S Carlock is Berghmans Lhoist Professor in Entrepreneurial Leadership at INSEAD (France and Singapore) and Opus Endowed Professor of Family Enterprise at St Thomas University (USA).

June 1, 2002

The next generation of mentors – parents, uncles, aunts, grandparents, senior business leaders and advisors – play an important role in guiding the next generation of family members. Career planning strategies can help these mentors prepare the next generation for their roles in the family business

Katherine Grady is a Senior Associate with Lansberg, Gersick & Associates LLC, a family business consulting firm in New Haven, Connecticut. She is also an Associate Clinical Professor of Psychology at Yale University.

The next generation of mentors – parents, uncles, aunts, grandparents, senior business leaders and advisors – play an important role in guiding the next generation of family members. Career planning strategies can help these mentors prepare the next generation for their roles in the family business

June 1, 2002

The best strategies in family companies are sound for both their business and their ownership. When boards successfully link these two realms, family businesses can often leverage significant strategic advantages over other companies

John L Ward is the Co-Director of the Center for Family Enterprises at Kellogg Graduate School of Management (USA) and the Wild Group Professor of Family Business at IMD (Switzerland). He serves on the boards of four family companies in Europe and the USA.

The best strategies in family companies are sound for both their business and their ownership. When boards successfully link these two realms, family businesses can often leverage significant strategic advantages over other companies

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