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Parmalat

December 19, 2008

Calisto Tanzi, the 70-year-old founder of Italian food and dairy company Parmalat, has been sentenced to 10 years in prison for market manipulation.

Calisto Tanzi, the 70-year-old founder of Italian food and dairy company Parmalat, has been sentenced to 10 years in prison for market manipulation.

Parmalat, formally owned by the Tanzi family, went bankrupt in 2003 after revealing that a $5.34 billion account at Bank of America didn't exist and stating that documents certifying the account were falsified.

October 21, 2008

Parmalat, the Italian food and dairy company formally owned by the Tanzi family, has lost its fraud case against Citigroup and been ordered to pay $364.2 million in damages.

Parmalat, the Italian food and dairy company formally owned by the Tanzi family, has lost its fraud case against Citigroup and been ordered to pay $364.2 million in damages.
 
Parmalat went bankrupt in 2003 after revealing that a $5.34 billion account at Bank of America didn't exist and stating that documents certifying the account were falsified.
 

July 1, 2007

Corporate scandals such as Parmalat not only changed the way business is conducted, but also forced business ethics into the mainstream. Marc Smith assesses whether teaching ethics could help future generations avoid the mistakes of the past

Marc Smith is acting editor of Families in Business.

Corporate scandals such as Parmalat not only changed the way business is conducted, but also forced business ethics into the mainstream. Marc Smith assesses whether teaching ethics could help future generations avoid the mistakes of the past

July 1, 2005

Their research on the outperformance of family firms versus their non-family counterparts in the S&P500 was revelatory – but as David Reeb and Ron Anderson explain, it also uncovered some serious governance issues and highlighted the need for outside input

David Reeb is an associate professor of finance and a Fuller research fellow at Temple University's Fox School of Business and Management Ron Anderson is a professor at American University, Washington DC

Their research on the outperformance of family firms versus their non-family counterparts in the S&P500 was revelatory – but as David Reeb and Ron Anderson explain, it also uncovered some serious governance issues and highlighted the need for outside input

November 1, 2004

Are family-controlled companies heavy handed in their treatment of outsiders? Or are outsiders unfairly contemptuous towards family businesses? Scott McCulloch reviews a few boardroom crackdowns

Scott Mcculloch is editor of Families in Business magazine.

Are family-controlled companies heavy handed in their treatment of outsiders? Or are outsiders unfairly contemptuous towards family businesses? Scott McCulloch reviews a few boardroom crackdowns

July 1, 2004

A spate of international financial scandals has forced governments to crack down on corporations, bringing corporate governance to the fore. But are the recommended steps to improve corporate behaviour fully applicable to family firms?

Hywel Lewis is a freelance financial journalist specialising in family business.

A spate of international financial scandals has forced governments to crack down on corporations, bringing corporate governance to the fore. But are the recommended steps to improve corporate behaviour fully applicable to family firms?

May 1, 2004

Family business tend to perform better than their non-family counterparts, which may be why more and more wildly successful firms like Google are getting in a family way

John L Ward is the Wild Group Professor of Family Business at IMD (Switzerland) and Co-Director of the Center for Family Enterprises at Kellogg School of Management (USA). He serves on the boards of four family companies in Europe and the USA.

Family business tend to perform better than their non-family counterparts, which may be why more and more wildly successful firms like Google are getting in a family way

May 1, 2004

The biggest family businesses capitalise on their family ownership in their brand – a smart move, as family values have the edge in the era of corporate mistrust

Melanie Stern is section editor of Families in Business magazine

The biggest family businesses capitalise on their family ownership in their brand – a smart move, as family values have the edge in the era of corporate mistrust

When asked what the most successful and most recognised family businesses are, who comes to mind? Ford Motor? Rothschild? Johnson & Johnson?

May 1, 2004

Just as having too little money can be emotionally troublesome, so can having too much; family business inheritors need to work hard to establish a sense of self in the face of an ­all-encompassing financial security blanket, says Melanie Stern

Melanie Stern is Section Editor of Families in Business magazine.

Just as having too little money can be emotionally troublesome, so can having too much; family business inheritors need to work hard to establish a sense of self in the face of an ­all-encompassing financial security blanket, says Melanie Stern

At 21, most young adults receive a metaphorical 'key to the door'. The average 21-year-old is either ensconced in study or figuring out their first years in the world of work, understanding their place in society and generally having a good time.

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