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next generation

May 1, 2005

Passing the baton of leadership to the next generation is often fraught with problems. Dennis Jaffe outlines the hurdles faced by two sets of siblings and describes how they achieved harmony in their relationships, as well as ensuring success for their businesses

Dennis Jaffe is a founding member of the Aspen Family Business Group. www.aspenfamilybusiness.com

Passing the baton of leadership to the next generation is often fraught with problems. Dennis Jaffe outlines the hurdles faced by two sets of siblings and describes how they achieved harmony in their relationships, as well as ensuring success for their businesses

May 1, 2005

To prepare your heirs to take the reins of your family business, you must start early and be more of a mentor than a boss. Karen Vinton believes that a light touch and plenty of encouragement are the best way to reap satisfying dividends from willing offspring

Karen Vinton is a family business consultant with Vinton Consulting Services in Gallatin Gateway, Montana

To prepare your heirs to take the reins of your family business, you must start early and be more of a mentor than a boss. Karen Vinton believes that a light touch and plenty of encouragement are the best way to reap satisfying dividends from willing offspring

May 1, 2005

Offering clearly marked highways and pointing out the right junctions is an effective way to motivate young people to commit to the family business. Mika Mustakallio looks at the options for preparing the next generation for the road to prosperity

Mika Mustakallio is a founding member of FBN International's Next Generation Working Group. www.fbn-i.org

Offering clearly marked highways and pointing out the right junctions is an effective way to motivate young people to commit to the family business. Mika Mustakallio looks at the options for preparing the next generation for the road to prosperity

January 1, 2005

“Any fool can make a fortune. It takes a man of brains to hold on to it after it is made.”

Johan Lambrecht and diane arijs are respectively director and scientific researcher of the Research Centre for Entrepreneurship, EHSAL-KU Brussel in Brussels.

"Any fool can make a fortune. It takes a man of brains to hold on to it after it is made."

November 1, 2004

Jean Duval had mixed feelings as he left the family meeting and drove back home.

Jean Duval had mixed feelings as he left the family meeting and drove back home. Once again he was very pleased with the outstanding results of the family business, Duval Food, which the management had presented to the family at the meeting. For the fifth time in a row, both sales and profits had risen significantly.

Jean was also highly satisfied with the excellent understanding which prevailed among his four children during the meeting.

November 1, 2004

Parents are the most influential factor in unleashing the next generation's entrepreneurial development. Daisy Medici explains how parents can foster entrepreneurship by giving children permission to express their passions, experience failures and celebrate successes against a backdrop of family love, respect and core values

Daisy Medici is managing director of Genus Resources, a family business consulting firm.

Parents are the most influential factor in unleashing the next generation's entrepreneurial development. Daisy Medici explains how parents can foster entrepreneurship by giving children permission to express their passions, experience failures and celebrate successes against a backdrop of family love, respect and core values

September 1, 2004

The end of succession by autocratic decree wasn’t the threat it appeared. Career choice has paved the way for a uniquely business-savvy next generation – who join the fold because they’re passionate about their family business. Melanie Stern reports

Melanie Stern is section editor of Families in Business magazine.

The end of succession by autocratic decree wasn't the threat it appeared. Career choice has paved the way for a uniquely business-savvy next generation – who join the fold because they're passionate about their family business. Melanie Stern reports

July 1, 2004

Our 2004 Conference brought together a broad group of speakers including some leading family business owners – from across the UK, Ireland, Switzerland and the Netherlands – to discuss their perspectives on the issue of managing transitions. Here’s my pick of some of the most interesting discussion points that came up.

Grant Gordon is director general of the Institute for Family Business (UK). www.ifb.org.uk

Our 2004 Conference brought together a broad group of speakers including some leading family business owners – from across the UK, Ireland, Switzerland and the Netherlands – to discuss their perspectives on the issue of managing transitions. Here's my pick of some of the most interesting discussion points that came up.

A model for transitions

July 1, 2004

One of the first features I wrote was on how easy it can be to drift into the family business.

John Stepek  is the son of a retired second generation family business owner. He lives and works in London as a finance journalist.

One of the first features I wrote was on how easy it can be to drift into the family business. I called it 'The Marshmallow Effect' – where an heir is dissuaded from making hard choices about their future by opting for the apparently soft, comfortable option of the family business, only to find once inside, the environment is somewhat suffocating and too sticky to leave.

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