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liquidity

March 5, 2020

If your family firm is considering working with outside investors, remember that the old axiom “knowledge is power” still holds true. For example, bringing in an outside investor does not have to take the “family” out of family firm. Yet, as with any change in ownership structure, you need to consider the types of investors who are going to provide a good fit for your business.

If your family firm is considering working with outside investors, remember that the old axiom “knowledge is power” still holds true. For example, bringing in an outside investor does not have to take the “family” out of family firm. Yet, as with any change in ownership structure, you need to consider the types of investors who are going to provide a good fit for your business.

January 27, 2020

How should global business families of wealth navigate the choppy investment waters in the year ahead? Is a global economic recession looming and what does that mean for family investors? Emma Rutter, investment director at Ruffer LLP, urges diversification in portfolios, says environmental, social and governance (ESG) criteria should be a prism to view all investments through and explains why “liquidity will be king”.

How should global business families of wealth navigate the choppy investment waters in the year ahead? Is a global economic recession looming and what does that mean for family investors? Emma Rutter, investment director at Ruffer LLP, urges diversification in portfolios, says environmental, social and governance (ESG) criteria should be a prism to view all investments through and explains why “liquidity will be king”.

Where does Ruffer see investment opportunities in 2020?

September 2, 2011

It is not surprising to hear that some asset-rich family offices have cash-flow concerns. A number of family offices need to generate more cash to support family expenditures.

It is not surprising to hear that some asset-rich family offices have cash-flow concerns. A number of family offices need to generate more cash to support family expenditures. Every office has its own reasons for this: marriages, divorces, births, illnesses, deaths etcetera…

At the same time, family offices are dealing with a unique combination of historically low interest rates and inflationary pressures. A lack of liquidity, not just yields, in some markets and asset classes has also become a key investment concern for family office executives.

October 14, 2008

Family-owned Paul Reinhert AG, one of the world’s biggest cotton merchants, is facing a severe liquidity crisis in its US business as a result of losses incurred from a surge in cotton prices earlier this year.

Family-owned Paul Reinhert AG, one of the world's biggest cotton merchants, is facing a severe liquidity crisis in its US business as a result of losses incurred from a surge in cotton prices earlier this year.

Bloomberg is reporting that it has seen a letter sent by Paul Reinhert Inc, as the US-based subsidiary is known, to farmers detailing that an "unexpected, historic run-up'' in cotton has led to the company being short of "virtually all available cash."

September 1, 2008

Campden FB conducted an online "selling the family business" survey to get the views of families from all over the world on this crucial topic.

Campden FB conducted an online "selling the family business" survey to get the views of families from all over the world on this crucial topic.

Analysis is provided by Jonathan Pellegrin below. To view a full breakdown of the results click here.

September 1, 2004

The globalisation of world economies means many family businesses must grow strategically to survive. More often than not, the growth capital requirements of the family firm clash with the liquidity and control needs of the family shareholders. What to do? Francois de Visscher explains

Francois de Visscher is founder and president of the family business consultancy de Visscher & Co.

The globalisation of world economies means many family businesses must grow strategically to survive. More often than not, the growth capital requirements of the family firm clash with the liquidity and control needs of the family shareholders. What to do? Francois de Visscher explains

September 1, 2004

Choosing between legacy and liquidity

Peter Munro, CEO of Turner-Munro International, a large family-owned furniture manufacturer, finds himself at a crossroads shortly after the death of his long-time business partner. Should he sell the business or keep it in the family?

Peter, age 69, never imagined that he might consider selling the business that he and his partner Lawrence Turner founded nearly 40 years ago. Childhood friends, Peter and Lawrence became business partners in their late 20s. Together, they built a sizeable, profitable company, one of the largest furniture manufacturers in the region.

June 1, 2003

My earliest memories of ‘the business’ were of the Saturday mornings spent with Dad on the factory floor.

My earliest memories of 'the business' were of the Saturday mornings spent with Dad on the factory floor. He would walk around checking on orders, work-in-progress, and what had been billed the day before. I would pick up tiny pieces of cloth clippings from the cutting room floor and would spend the rest of the time thinking of innumerable crafty things to do with them. The car ride to Boston and breakfast at the Peter Pan Restaurant would give us ample time to talk about how Dad came to have his own business and how he bought out his father, Joe.

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