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family council

October 29, 2009

When a family starts to work together to organise a family council and create family policies, the questions inevitably comes up: "what will we do if someone doesn't follow the rules?", writes Christian Stewart

When a family starts to work together to organise a family council, to define different roles and responsibilities in the family business and to create family policies and agreements, the question inevitably comes up: "what will we do if someone doesn't follow the rules?"

May 1, 2007

More and more family businesses are bringing in non-family CEOs to help them grow and succeed. But creating the right environment for them to succeed in is tricky, as Andrew Keyt, Joe Astrachan and Tim Blumentritt discovered in a recent study

More and more family businesses are bringing in non-family CEOs to help them grow and succeed. But creating the right environment for them to succeed in is tricky, as Andrew Keyt, Joe Astrachan and Tim Blumentritt discovered in a recent study.

Andrew Keyt is executive director of the Family Business Center at Loyola University Chicago.

Joe Astrachan is distinguished research fellow Loyola University Chicago and director of the Cox Family Enterprise Center, Kennesaw State University.

November 1, 2006

It can often be easier to monitor the success of the business with the appropriate measures, than to address the more emotionally charged success of you as a family. Andrew Keyt explains why a family council is essential to the longevity of the business

Andrew Keyt is president of the US chapter of FBN International and executive director of the Loyola University Chicago Family Business Center.

It can often be easier to monitor the success of the business with the appropriate measures, than to address the more emotionally charged success of you as a family. Andrew Keyt explains why a family council is essential to the longevity of the business

November 1, 2004

There is often a difficult dynamic between the shareholder’s need for return and the emotional attachment of the family to the business. A governance structure is required, namely the family council. Andrew Keyt explains

Andrew Keyt is president of the US chapter of the FBN and executive director of the Chicago Family Business Center.

There is often a difficult dynamic between the shareholder's need for return and the emotional attachment of the family to the business. A governance structure is required, namely the family council. Andrew Keyt explains

April 1, 2003

The family council can provide a forum where families can discuss strategic issues and formulate policies that are well-matched to their goals as shareholders

Grant Gordon is Director General of the Institute for Family Business (UK).

The family council can provide a forum where families can discuss strategic issues and formulate policies that are well-matched to their goals as shareholders

In family business, planning for the future is one of the keys to securing long-term shareholder adhesion to the family project. The family council is arguably one of the principal tools at the disposal of families to help better plan their futures and exercise greater control over the outcomes.

February 1, 2002

Swiss family businesses are focused on the relevant business and corporate issues that need to be addressed for future success but fare less well on the emotional issues such as succession

Lombard Odier & Cie, in conjunction with IMD, carried out an in-depth study on family businesses in Switzerland during Spring 2001 because we became aware that little is known about such businesses, even though they are the key threads of the Swiss social and economic fabric. Therefore, we tried to better understand the ties between these families and their companies, to become aware of their concerns relating to the continuity and passing on of those businesses and to define the relevant issues more efficiently.

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