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disruptive innovation

April 23, 2015

Online sales look set to cut through the notoriously opaque and traditionally relationship-driven art market, according to a new trade report conducted by research and analysis firm ArtTactic.

Online sales look set to cut through the notoriously opaque and traditionally relationship-driven art market, according to a new trade report conducted by research and analysis firm ArtTactic.

The Online Art Trade Report 2015 found the online market grew 68% to an estimated $2.64 billion in 2014, and the majority of buyers were motivated by potential investment returns on their purchase.

August 7, 2014

With the ability to create everything from human organs to houses, 3D printing is being touted as one of the next big disruptive technologies. CampdenFB looks at whether family offices can mint any money from the industry

For more than 20 years, US-based investment adviser Trent Capital Management has invested its clients’ money in smart technology companies. Mainly in mobile phone companies. As of now, the company has a new investment policy: 3D printing.

“It’s the first thing we’ve seen come along that is going to be as universally disruptive as the cellular telephone industry,” says Trent Capital Management partner Jim Folds, who is advising the company’s family office clients among others that the technology’s time is about to come.

August 7, 2014

Almost two decades since the concept of disruptive innovation was thrust into public consciousness, companies have both risen and fallen prey to the process. Kodak was a loser, Amazon was a winner, and the iPhone alone has disrupted a number of technologies – cameras, alarm clocks and radios, to name a few.

Almost two decades since the concept of disruptive innovation was thrust into public consciousness, companies have both risen and fallen prey to the process. Kodak was a loser, Amazon was a winner, and the iPhone alone has disrupted a number of technologies – cameras, alarm clocks and radios, to name a few.

But this June Harvard Business School professor Jill Lepore argued it was time to give the concept (whereby new innovations suddenly shake up the marketplace, replacing predecessor technologies) a rest.

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