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September 21, 2011

Africa could be on the brink of an economic take-off, much like China was 30 years ago and India 20 years ago. Political advancement and recent economic growth are making the continent an increasingly attractive investment option.

Africa could be on the brink of an economic take-off, much like China was 30 years ago and India 20 years ago. Political advancement and recent economic growth are making the continent an increasingly attractive investment option.

But investing in the continent isn't something to be taken lightly. Jeremy Hazlehurst looks at why.

Read the full story at CampdenFO.

January 1, 2007

Despite the political and social problems in the Middle East, Dubai appears to have carved itself an untroubled niche, where foreign investors and residents are able to live and do business with the rest of the world in peace and security. David Nicholson reports

David Nicholson is a freelance journalist based in London.

Despite the political and social problems in the Middle East, Dubai appears to have carved itself an untroubled niche, where foreign investors and residents are able to live and do business with the rest of the world in peace and security. David Nicholson reports

Property developers and businesspeople in general have been amazed at the rapid growth of Shanghai over the past few years, as giant office and residential buildings have risen from the ground.

September 1, 2004

Entering a new phase in growth and development

Bill gordon sits on the FBN's steering committee and board.

Entering a new phase in growth and development

The way ahead for FBN International is challenging, exciting and will be more rewarding for our members across our growing global network. We are embracing change with a real sense of positive energy, shaped by the forward thinking proposals developed by the Steering Group, set up after the board meeting in October 2003.

November 1, 2003

There are fundamental differences in the assumptions and practices of family and non-family firms. While non-family firms can learn much from the ‘family business paradigm’, family firms need to be careful not to ignore the perspectives of efficient markets, asset leverage, strategic revolution, and economically driven personal leadership

John L Ward is the Co-Director of the Center for Family Enterprises at Kellogg Graduate School of Management (USA) and the Wild Group Professor of Family Business at IMD (Switzerland). He serves on the boards of four family companies in Europe and the USA.

February 1, 2002

In the first of a two part series, Kelin Gersick explores the implications of family development in the context of family business growth, development and success. Part two will explore specific applications of the model in governance design

The main challenge facing business families as they move to the second, third and later generations is maintaining a sense of connection across an increasingly disparate group of relatives. Can 50 (or 200) cousins spread across many countries and around the world retain an identity as a family? So far, most of the literature on family firms focuses on the first-generation nuclear family – one pair of parents and their children moving through their life cycle. In fact, the most difficult dilemmas for business families arise as they become more complex.

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