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May 28, 2020

A pandemic has struck in the form of Covid-19, grinding the global economy to a halt. Politicians are desperately scrambling to enact legislation to protect their constituents as corporate chief executives jockey for the position of being the first constituent in line for their bailout. Unprecedented payments are being made by governments to their citizens to help meet their short-term obligations, and financial markets have utterly collapsed to the tune of extreme volatility, that in crypto, we call Monday.

April 20, 2020

After the first wave of the Covid-19 outbreak in China and East Asia, and the second wave in Western Europe and North America, a third wave now looks to be building in several Emerging Markets (EM) and frontier countries, says Amundi Asset Management. EM and frontier countries may be able to benefit from the experiences and best practices then put in place in countries affected by the pandemic earlier. However, most of them do not have well-equipped health systems and lack the resources to deal with a health emergency vs developed countries. Covid-19 will have very significant negative effects on the economic outlooks for EM, mostly leading to recessions.

After the first wave of the Covid-19 outbreak in China and East Asia, and the second wave in Western Europe and North America, a third wave now looks to be building in several Emerging Markets (EM) and frontier countries, says Amundi Asset Management.

October 10, 2016

Could currency volatility be the first symptom of wider stress in financial markets? William Cainreports 

Could currency volatility be the first symptom of wider stress in financial markets? William Cainreports 

Currency considerations are never far away from any debate about the economic fortunes of the world’s three largest economies. China’s switch to a freer-floating currency regime in mid-2015 saw the yuan devalue, triggering a bout of market panic in the third quarter of last year.

July 24, 2015

Volatility in the US Treasury market at the end of 2014 could be a taste of the next financial panic. And risk parity, a hedge fund strategy that made hay through leveraged exposure to bonds over the last 20 years, may be part of the problem rather than the solution.

Volatility in the US Treasury market at the end of 2014 could be a taste of the next financial panic.

And risk parity, a hedge fund strategy that made hay through leveraged exposure to bonds over the last 20 years, may be part of the problem rather than the solution.

Risk parity strategies create specific risk levels across an investment portfolio in contrast to traditional allocation models that are based on holding a certain percentage of investment class, such as 60% equities and 40% bonds, within a portfolio.

June 28, 2010

The latest edition of Campden FO, the magazine dedicated to the global family office community, is now available. There are two areas of focus to this issue: tax and family offices in Asia.

The latest edition of Campden FO, the magazine dedicated to the global family office community, is now available. There are two areas of focus to this issue: tax and family offices in Asia. Click here to go straight to the issue.

June 18, 2010

Recent problems in the Eurozone have reminded investors just how volatile currencies can be. Michael Fischer asks how family offices are managing their foreign currency exposure.

Recent problems in the Eurozone have reminded investors just how volatile currencies can be. Michael Fischer asks how family offices are managing their foreign currency exposure. 

The global financial crisis raised concerns about foreign currency exposure at family offices around the world, and the market-roiling decline of the euro and sovereign debt problems of recent months have only intensified those concerns.

June 9, 2010

Family offices have grown increasingly concerned about their foreign currency exposure in recent months as they have watched the euro spiral downward and sovereign debt problems surface around the world, writes Michael S Fischer.

Family offices have grown increasingly concerned about their foreign currency exposure in recent months as they have watched the euro spiral downward and sovereign debt problems surface around the world, writes Michael S Fischer.

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