Vimeo
LinkedIn
Instagram
Share |

compensation

January 10, 2017

Human capital is a term coined by Gary Becker, an economist from the University of Chicago, which refers to the abilities and skills of an individual as an economic value. But how are family offices managing human capital in 2016?

Human capital is a term coined by Gary Becker, an economist from the University of Chicago, which refers to the abilities and skills of an individual as an economic value. But how are family offices managing human capital in 2016?

October 29, 2015

Thirty-five per cent of family office CEOs are female, according to a new report, compared to just 4.6% in the S&P 500.Thirty-five per cent of family office CEOs are female, according to a new report, compared to just 4.6% in the S&P 500.

The diversity of families appears to be reflected in family office personnel – at least when it comes to gender – research from Family Office Exchange (FOX) and US advisory firm Grant Thornton suggests.

In a survey of 112 family offices, 35% were headed by a female chief executive, said the 2015 FOX Family Office Compensation and Benefits Report, compared to 4.6% in the S&P 500. In a release FOX said the gender statistics had been “surprising”.

March 29, 2012

How much do family offices pay? Few seem to know, but through an extensive survey of the sector in the UK and Switzerland, CampdenFO in association with the executive search firm Sulger Buel & Company reveals just how much offices are compensating their top staff. The numbers make fascinating reading.

If family offices are considered part of the financial services industry, then how much they are paying their senior managers is arguably the least transparent of the entire sector. That of course suits family offices, which for the most part guard their confidentiality more than most other areas of the financial services sector. But things are opening up.

September 6, 2010

Paul Golden analyses the best compensation strategies for senior family office staff

With opinion divided on the extent of bonuses – and the merits of long-term retention – it is easy to see why there is nothing approaching a standard model for family office remuneration.

May 1, 2008

We have seen how important fairness is when paying operational family members, now we look at how to reward those who are not involved in the business. Steve McClure analyses how best it can be done

We have seen how important fairness is when paying operational family members, now we look at how to reward those who are not involved in the business. Steve McClure analyses how best it can be done

May 1, 2008

Tom Davidow kicks off our focus on remuneration by taking a look at how family businesses should compensate family members who are active in the company. This must be appropriate and fair or else the dynamics of the family may suffer …

Tom Davidow kicks off our focus on remuneration by taking a look at how family businesses should compensate family members who are active in the company. This must be appropriate and fair or else the dynamics of the family may suffer …

In a climate where million dollar CEO salaries, bonuses and benefits in publicly traded companies are so huge that the public cannot relate to them, family-controlled Aflac Inc has become the first US public company to empower shareholders to vote on executive compensation.

November 1, 2005

To stay ahead of the game, businesses need to recruit and retain top-quality staff at all levels – but especially at the top – so incentives and rewards are key. Melanie Stern examines the changes ahead in executive compensation for non-family CEOs

Melanie stern is section editor of Families in Business.

To stay ahead of the game, businesses need to recruit and retain top-quality staff at all levels – but especially at the top – so incentives and rewards are key. Melanie Stern examines the changes ahead in executive compensation for non-family CEOs

Much has been made of the compensation packages awarded to today's top executives, with pay packets expanding faster than the waistlines of most well-dined CEOs – all too often, while their companies underperform.

July 1, 2005

It makes sense to formalise employment contracts, both for employees and employer in family companies. Employment agreements encourage healthy communication, prevent resentments from building up and avoid disputes arising later on, advises Jeffrey Wolfson

Jeffrey Wolfson is a family business attorney at Goulston & Storrs and is chairman emeritus of the Northeastern University Center for Family Business. www.jwolfson@goulstonstorrs.com

It makes sense to formalise employment contracts, both for employees and employer in family companies. Employment agreements encourage healthy communication, prevent resentments from building up and avoid disputes arising later on, advises Jeffrey Wolfson

July 1, 2005

Money and how it is distributed among stakeholders in family businesses is a source of great conflict. But if systems are set up to standardise payouts, it will serve to educate those involved and avoid resentment and conflict arising, writes Sam Lane

Sam Lane is a family business consultant with the Aspen Family Business Group

Money and how it is distributed among stakeholders in family businesses is a source of great conflict. But if systems are set up to standardise payouts, it will serve to educate those involved and avoid resentment and conflict arising, writes Sam Lane

Click here >>
Close