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October 29, 2015

Thirty-five per cent of family office CEOs are female, according to a new report, compared to just 4.6% in the S&P 500.Thirty-five per cent of family office CEOs are female, according to a new report, compared to just 4.6% in the S&P 500.

The diversity of families appears to be reflected in family office personnel – at least when it comes to gender – research from Family Office Exchange (FOX) and US advisory firm Grant Thornton suggests.

In a survey of 112 family offices, 35% were headed by a female chief executive, said the 2015 FOX Family Office Compensation and Benefits Report, compared to 4.6% in the S&P 500. In a release FOX said the gender statistics had been “surprising”.

January 1, 2004

A family council is common in a large, sophisticated family-run firm. But they can be tricky to implement and, like families, each is unique and evolves in its own way

John L Ward is the Co-Director of the Center for Family Enterprises at Kellogg School of Management (USA) and the Wild Group Professor of Family Business at IMD (Switzerland). He serves on the boards of four family companies in Europe and the USA.

A family council is common in a large, sophisticated family-run firm. But they can be tricky to implement and, like families, each is unique and evolves in its own way

November 1, 2003

An increasing number of employers are looking at flexible benefits to improve recruitment and retention levels. Is it time your family business became more flexible?

Shawn Healy is a Senior Tax Manager with The BDO Centre for Family Business, formerly the Stoy Centre for Family Business, which was set up in 1992 dedicated to serving the needs and raising the profile of UK family businesses.

An increasing number of employers are looking at flexible benefits to improve recruitment and retention levels. Is it time your family business became more flexible?

November 1, 2003

In this day and age it is difficult for companies to retain staff long-term, especially the under 35s, and employee benefits can be an added incentive. It appears, however, that it is not only the benefits that encourage long-term service with a company

John Stepek is the son of a retired second generation family business owner. He lives and works in London as a financial journalist.

In this day and age it is difficult for companies to retain staff long-term, especially the under 35s, and employee benefits can be an added incentive. It appears, however, that it is not only the benefits that encourage long-term service with a company

November 1, 2003

If you are considering making changes to your employee benefit programme, now is a good time to do it – with little volatility in the employment market there should be a minimal negative impact. As long as it is handled carefully it could be cost-effective for your business too...

Philip Houghton and Paul Mather are Senior Consultants with Sibson Consulting, a global human capital consulting firm, based in London. Bart Huby is a Partner with Lane, Clark & Peacock LLP, an actuarial partnership with offices in London and Winchester, UK.

If you are considering making changes to your employee benefit programme, now is a good time to do it – with little volatility in the employment market there should be a minimal negative impact. As long as  it is handled carefully it could be cost-effective for your business too...

June 1, 2002

The Lindström family is a good example of how serial business families can use their past experience to avoid recurring ‘situations’ – and ultimately run a business that benefits the business and the family members involved

Denise Kenyon-Rouvinez is President and Founder of the Family Business Network Suisse Romande, and Associate of The Family Business ­Consulting Group.

The Lindström family is a good example of how serial business families can use their past experience to avoid recurring 'situations' – and ultimately run a business that benefits the business and the family members involved

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