Vimeo
LinkedIn
Instagram
Share |

The great privacy debate

Equipped with some of the sharpest legal minds on protecting privacy anywhere, sympathetic judges and fool-proof gagging orders - the UK has been a top destination for those looking for anonymity.

If you are a wealthy person interested in protecting you privacy, the UK was always a good place to live. Equipped with some of the sharpest legal minds on protecting privacy anywhere, sympathetic judges and fool-proof gagging orders – the UK has been a top destination for those looking for anonymity.

Or at least that has been the case up until recently. But today saw Max Mosley, the former head of Formula One, lose his appeal in the European Court of Human Rights to force UK newspapers to warn people in advance of publishing details about their private lives. As the European Court put it, this would have had a “chilling effect” on journalism.

Freedom of the press has just regained some ground in the UK.

And recent debates over super injunctions, the enemy of celebrity and investigative journalists across the UK, also hold some hope for those arguing for further freedom of the press.

Although these super gagging orders prevent any mention of the parties concerned to the point where it is prohibited to even mention that an injunction has been granted, they only apply to the UK regulated press. Social networking sites, foreign media and other forms of non-regulated media can easily blow the lid on these injunctions if they should wish to.

So however hard public figures might try to keep their private lives out of the public domain, they can’t stop the determined, although sometimes false, whistleblower on twitter tweeting their secrets to the world.
 

Click here >>
Close