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It’s an interesting word, “friends”. It suggests that doing business is a question of relationships, not fisticuffs. Most businesses probably recognise that far more than the idea of business as war.

It’s an interesting word, “friends”. It suggests that doing business is a question of relationships, not fisticuffs. Most businesses probably recognise that far more than the idea of business as war.

In capitalism, wealth surges to the top but only trickles to the bottom, as was illustrated between 1870 and 1900 when a band of US industrialists became enriched beyond the realms of avarice.

In capitalism, wealth surges to the top but only trickles to the bottom, as was illustrated between 1870 and 1900 when a band of US industrialists became enriched beyond the realms of avarice.

Stories about corruption follow a familiar arc. It is exposed by the press (or bloggers) and condemned, and then others come along who shrug in a worldly way, give a wry smile and explain that this is how business is done.

Stories about corruption follow a familiar arc. It is exposed by the press (or bloggers) and condemned, and then others come along who shrug in a worldly way, give a wry smile and explain that this is how business is done.

One thing the financial meltdown of 2008 and the subsequent slowdown in economic growth for much of the world has sparked is a debate about the appropriate types of capitalism for the future. Much talk has centred on reining in the excesses of the financial services sector that nearly led the world into global depression.

One thing the financial meltdown of 2008 and the subsequent slowdown in economic growth for much of the world has sparked is a debate about the appropriate types of capitalism for the future. Much talk has centred on reining in the excesses of the financial services sector that nearly led the world into global depression.

Five years after the credit crisis began we have entered a bull market for regulation. It is stretching further, and faster, than most of us realise. The process is inevitable, following recent excesses. Some aspects of it are beneficial. But the line between market regulation and capital punishment is becoming increasingly thin.

Five years after the credit crisis began we have entered a bull market for regulation. It is stretching further, and faster, than most of us realise. The process is inevitable, following recent excesses. Some aspects of it are beneficial. But the line between market regulation and capital punishment is becoming increasingly thin.

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