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The value of power

There are plenty of list cataloguing the world's wealthiest people, but can you measure power in monetary terms?
Power wealthy Bill Clinton, with $227 billion-worth of influence
© Vince Musi

There are plenty of list cataloguing the world's wealthiest people, but can you measure power in monetary terms?

Research firm Wealth-X reckons you can and says it is business and political associations that makes people power wealthy and not just personal fortune.

The wealth research firm has come up with a system to give social capital a monetary value – a value distinct from the individual's personal fortune, taking into account connections as well as wealth.

Topping its list as the most powerful person is Bill Gates. Not only is he the US's richest man with a fortune of $61 billion (€41.1 billion) according to Forbes, he's also got a wealth of business connections, runs an investment vehicle and is active in philanthropy. Wealth-X pegged his influence value at $227 billion.

Former US president Bill Clinton came second. Although his personal fortune of $38 million was dwarfed by the wealth of others on the list, his influence value was $227 billion – Clinton’s support is worth billions of dollars because of his political clout and his connections with leaders across the globe.

Leaders of long-established family businesses were thin on the ground, perhaps due to the fact they are often determined to stay out of the public gaze. But family business founders Warren Buffett and Rupert Murdoch came in at number five and number eight respectively. 

 

Diary, Family Business, research
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