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FB Roundup: Goya Foods, Walmart, and Volkswagen

Goya Foods donates 10,000 pounds of food per month to Catholic diocese; Walmart Reaches Deal With Visa to End Credit-Card Ban in Canada; and Volkswagen Group says ‘auf wiedersehen’ to official language

Goya Foods donates 10,000 pounds of food per month to Catholic diocese

Goya Foods, the largest Hispanic-owned food company in the United States, has revealed it will donate 125,000 pounds of food to an agency dedicated to serving the less fortunate in northern New Jersey.

Based in Jersey City, Goya Foods will send 10,000 pounds of food each month to Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Newark, which will distribute the goods to Hudson, Bergen, Essex and Union counties.

The company also pledged a one-time donation of $10,000 to the archdiocese, which will be used to fund renovations to recreational spaces at the facilities as well as for additional food and clothing for the homeless.

Goya Foods, headquartered in New Jersey, has doubled in size since 2000, growing in line with the US’s increasing Hispanic population. The firm reported revenues of $1.3 billion in 2012.

Walmart Reaches Deal With Visa to End Credit-Card Ban in Canada

Walmart Stores, the US retail giant controlled by the Walton family, has reached an agreement to continue accepting Visa Inc credit cards in Canada.

The Arkansas-based retailer threatened to bar the world’s largest payments network from its 409 stores unless the network agreed to lower the amount it charges for credit card transactions.

“We have come to an agreement with Wal-Mart through which Visa credit cards will be accepted at all Canadian Wal-Mart stores,” Carla Hindman, a Visa Canada spokeswoman, said in a statement.

The second-generation family business posted revenues of $482.1 billion in 2016.

Volkswagen Group says ‘auf wiedersehen’ to official language

Family-controlled carmaker Volkswagen has switched its official language to English to help attract managers and executives.

In a sign of an increasingly globalised economy, Volkswagen also believes the move will help make it easier to communicate between its worldwide subsidiaries and coordinate operations.

Volkswagen was originally established in 1937 by the German Labour Front and is today controlled by the third-generation of the Piech and Porsche families.

The German carmaker reported 2015 first-half revenues of €109 billion ($120 billion).


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